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El Reyno De Espana Dividido en Dos grandes Estados De Aragon Y De Castilla Sudivido en muchas Provincias donde se halla tambien El Reyno De Portugal

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COD. ART.: 1519. Category: . Tags: , , .

Rare Spanish language map of Spain and Portugal including Balearic Islands based on Thomas Lopez. The map published as separate leaf includes a finely engraved cartouche surmounted by a coat of arms with companion French title in smaller cartouche at bottom left. Published by Jean Baptiste Nolin in Paris this is one of the few antique map in Spanish language.

Jean-Baptiste Nolin (1657 – 1725) was a French cartographer and publisher active in Paris during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the present wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin’s desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. In 1705, he was successfully sued by Guillaume De L’Isle for copyright infringement, a case which cost him significant scientific credibility. Nonetheless, Nolin remained commercially popular and prosperous.


Rare Spanish language map of Spain and Portugal including Balearic Islands based on Thomas Lopez. The map published as separate leaf includes a finely engraved cartouche surmounted by a coat of arms with companion French title in smaller cartouche at bottom left. Published by Jean Baptiste Nolin in Paris this is one of the few antique map in Spanish language.

Jean-Baptiste Nolin (1657 – 1725) was a French cartographer and publisher active in Paris during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Nolin was one of the most accomplished and certainly the most ambitious French cartographer of his era. The artistic élan of his compositions evinced a style that preserved the rhetorical ambitions of the Baroque ethic, while anticipating the playful elegance of the Rococo period. His masterpieces, many like the present wall map, were monumental in scale and represented Nolin’s desire to overwhelm his competition in what was a very challenging market. In 1705, he was successfully sued by Guillaume De L’Isle for copyright infringement, a case which cost him significant scientific credibility. Nonetheless, Nolin remained commercially popular and prosperous.